Councilmember Stinziano Announces June Community Hours

Councilmember Michael Stinziano will hold Community Hours in June across the City to listen to issues and concerns of Columbus residents. 

Community Hours offer citizens the opportunity to tell Councilmember Stinziano what is important to them and how he and City Council can help.  All members of the Columbus community are encouraged to attend.

“Significant issues confront our diverse city every day. I want to hear, firsthand, from my constituents about what concerns them as we work together to make our neighborhoods the best places to live, work, start a business and raise a family in Ohio,” said Stinziano.

Councilmember Stinziano will hold June Community Hours at the following locations: 

Saturday, June 3
Panera Bread—Polaris
1391 Polaris Pkwy, Columbus, OH 43240
1:30-3pm

Saturday, June 10
Gethsemane United Methodist Church
5081 Carbondale Dr., Columbus, OH 43232
1:30-3pm

Wednesday, June 14
Global Gallery Coffee Shop
3535 N. High St., Columbus, OH 43214
9-10:30am

Wednesday, June 21
Columbus Metropolitan Library—Martin Luther King Branch
1600 E. Long St., Columbus, OH 43203
5:30-7pm

Thursday, June 29
Bottoms Up Coffee Co-Op
1069 W. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43222
8:30-10am


For additional information contact:
Stephanie Megas
614-645-8311

City council approves $861.4 million capital budget for 2017

The Columbus City Council has approved $861.4 million in capital spending for this year, including water and sewer upgrades, parks improvements, street repaving and other neighborhood investments.

Council members approved the 2017 capital-improvements budget Monday. Mayor Andrew J. Ginther has said the spending plan is aggressive and fiscally responsible and helps all city residents. For every dollar the city allocates this year, he said, 88 cents will help neighborhoods.

The plan represents $861.4 million in “great projects,” said Dan Giangardella, the Ginther administration’s deputy director of finance, and reflects the mayor’s three priorities of “neighborhoods, neighborhoods, neighborhoods.”

South Side resident Maudie Grace, of the Deshler Park Civic Association, thanked the council for including money for park improvements in her area. Overall, nearly a third of the capital budget is directed at all types of projects on the South Side -- the most of any section in the city.

“It’s a step in the right direction,” Grace said.

Citywide, the capital budget includes $16 million in new money dedicated to recreation and parks projects this year.

The budget’s single largest line item sets aside $276 million to build and repair sanitary sewers. Another $212 million is dedicated to transportation projects, including street resurfacing, sidewalks, bike improvements and new traffic signals.

The budget includes about $11.9 million to relocate Cannon Drive running alongside Ohio State University’s Wexner Medical Center campus, and $13.1 million for a streetscape plan along High Street in the Short North.

Among public-safety projects, the budget includes: $6 million for a new Columbus Police Division substation near the Lazelle Woods Community Center at 8140 Sancus Blvd. on the Far North Side, $1.5 million for police server storage, about $6 million for new medics, trucks and equipment for the Columbus Division of Fire, and $4.7 million to build a new fire station at the southeast corner of Waggoner Road and East Broad Street on the Far East Side.

The budget also has about $220,000 to install in 18 firehouses new vending machines that firefighters will use to check out drugs that are needed to restock the city’s medic units. The vending machines will make it easier for the department to track which firefighters are checking out the drugs.

The city pays for capital projects by issuing voter-approved bond packages that are repaid using a portion of income-tax collections and utilities ratepayer fees. The city also uses Ohio Water Development Authority loans to finance projects, city Auditor Hugh Dorrian has said.

“I want to thank the voters of Columbus, who have given us the means to do the work,” Giangardella said.

About $323 million of the capital budget is new spending, with $538.5 million carried over from projects in previous years.

Six council members — President Zach Klein was absent — approved the capital budget unanimously.

“That theme of neighborhoods, neighborhoods, neighborhoods,” said Councilman Michael Stinziano, “it’s really going to have an impact.”

mlane@dispatch.com

 

Stinziano Urges Support for Issue 1

 Columbus Dispatch, 4/29/17

I want to thank the Dispatch editorial board for shining a light on Columbus’ older adults and encouraging voters to head to the polls  this Tuesday to vote for Issue 1 (April 23 editorial).

The Columbus region is expected to grow by more than 500,000 people in the next 30 years, largely in the age group 65 and older. As we look around the neighborhoods we’ve grown into and the large number of young professional and workers we’ve attracted to Columbus, it is crucial we plan for our growing and aging population.

Through the Age-Friendly Columbus initiative, I have seen firsthand how our residents and neighborhoods rely on the critical services provided by the Franklin County Senior Options.

Issue 1, or the Franklin County Senior Options Levy, will continue vital services, including home-delivered meals, care, adult daycare, emergency response systems and home repair for older adults in need.

Columbus voters have the collective opportunity and responsibility to protect services for senior citizens. I urge support for Issue 1 on Tuesday.

Michael Stinziano

Member Columbus City Council Columbus

May Community Hours

Councilmember Michael Stinziano will hold Community Hours in May across the City to listen to issues and concerns of Columbus residents.

Community Hours offer citizens the opportunity to tell Councilmember Stinziano what is important to them and how he and City Council can help. All members of the Columbus community are encouraged to attend.

“Significant issues confront our diverse City every day. I want to hear, firsthand, from my constituents about what concerns them as we work together to make our neighborhoods the best places to live, work, start a business and raise a family in Ohio,” said Stinziano.

Councilmember Stinziano will hold May Community Hours at the following locations:

Saturday, May 6
Amy’s Donuts
650 Georgesville Rd., Columbus, OH 43228
1:30pm-3:00pm

Wednesday, May 10
Columbus Metropolitan Library—Driving Park Branch
1422 E. Livingston Ave., Columbus, OH 43205
4:30pm-6:00pm

Saturday, May 20
Tim Hortons— McCutcheon & Stelzer
2845 Stelzer Rd., Columbus, OH 43219
1:30pm-3:00pm

Tuesday, May 23
Das KaffeeHaus von Frau Burkhart—Brewery District
1036 S. Front St., Columbus, OH 43206
9:00am-10:30am

Wednesday, May 31
Columbus Metropolitan Library—Karl Road Branch
5590 Karl Rd., Columbus, OH 43229
11:30am-1:00pm

For additional information contact:Stephanie Megas
614-645-8311

Councilmembers Push for Street Sweeping Notification System


[Columbus, OH] Building on Columbus’ reputation of being a “Smart City,” residents and businesses are now able to sign up for street sweeping reminders online.

Curbed public streets are swept citywide. The primary purpose of street sweeping is to remove dirt, litter and debris from curbs and prevent those materials from being washed into storm sewers.

In many neighborhoods, permanent signs identify street sweeping parking restrictions. Residents and visitors are required to check signs carefully and adhere to the posted schedule. Vehicles not moved on sweeping days are impounded and towed at the owner’s expense. 

“I have received numerous calls from residents frustrated about vehicles being towed or not knowing of street sweeping time periods,” said Councilmember Michael Stinziano. “As Chair of Council’s Technology Committee, I saw an opportunity to collaborate on a common sense notification system with the Department of Public Service and their street sweeping fleet.”

The Department of Public Service tool allows people to enter their street address to find out when street sweepers are next scheduled to visit their neighborhood. This resource is similar to the online tool the department uses to provide trash, yard-waste and recycling collection dates.

Residents can receive notifications by email, phone or calendar invite.

“I was happy to work together with Councilmember Stinziano as well as the Departments of Public Service and Technology to implement this notification system, saving residents a trip to the impound lot while continuing to provide this critical City service,” said Councilmember Shannon Hardin, chair of the Public Service and Transportation Committee.

To learn more or sign up for street sweeping reminders, visithttps://www.columbus.gov/publicservice/streets/Street-Sweeping/